Original Research

‘To your tents, O Nigeria’: An exegetical study of 1 Kings 12:1–16

Prince E. Peters, Malachy I. Okwueze, Paulinus O. Agbo
Verbum et Ecclesia | Vol 43, No 1 | a2536 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ve.v43i1.2536 | © 2022 Prince E. Peters, Malachy I. Okwueze, Paulinus O. Agbo | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 24 March 2022 | Published: 21 October 2022

About the author(s)

Prince E. Peters, Department of Religion and Cultural Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria; and Department of New Testament and Related Literature, Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Malachy I. Okwueze, Department of Religion and Cultural Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria; and Department of New Testament and Related Literature, Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Paulinus O. Agbo, Department of Religion and Cultural Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria; and Department of New Testament and Related Literature, Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Solomon’s exerting decrees led to Israel’s prosperity, yet they took away the freedom of the common folks. His son Rehoboam had just been anointed king over the whole of Israel, but this son, being less than his father, had to make compromises towards political demands from his subjects or the kingdom would divide. The common people of the north felt marginalised and encumbered, so they had to be listened to. Rehoboam’s first advisers told him to reassure the people of his magnanimity, but his contemporaries suggested he maintain his father’s zest even when he was not in any way as charismatic as his father. Revolt came and the united Kingdom of Israel collapsed. Nigeria’s leadership, toeing the same line of noninclusive governance, has provoked agitation leading to several calls for secession. Only a soft-pedalling and compromise on the Nigerian part can assuage the virulent and unyielding voices of discord and secession.

Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: By challenging the orthodox belief that a new Nigeria is possible without a radical approach to what divides, the study brought to the fore the possible situation that Nigeria could face as a result of insensitivity by the leaders and to contextually relate it to the mistakes of Rehoboam leading to the collapse of the united Kingdom of Israel.


Keywords

united Kingdom of Israel; Nigeria; Biafra; Igbo; 1 Kings 12:1–16; secession.

Metrics

Total abstract views: 189
Total article views: 224


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.