Original Research

2 Samuel 13:1–22 and the psychological effects of rape in Enugu State, Nigeria

Virginus U. Eze, Collins I. Ugwu
Verbum et Ecclesia | Vol 45, No 1 | a3066 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ve.v45i1.3066 | © 2024 Virginus U. Eze, Collins I. Ugwu | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 04 December 2023 | Published: 09 July 2024

About the author(s)

Virginus U. Eze, Department of Religion and Cultural Studies, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria; and, Department of Old Testament and Hebrew Scriptures, Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Collins I. Ugwu, Department of Religion and Cultural Studies, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria; and, Department of Old Testament and Hebrew Scriptures, Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Abstract

This article examines the Amnon–Tamar narrative in 2 Samuel 13:1–22 in the light of the psychological effects of rape in Enugu State, Nigeria. 2 Samuel 13:1–22 is an exposition on the tragic assault meted out on Tamar by his half-brother Ammon. Sexual violence, especially, rape is one of the social problems that is ravaging the people of Enugu state. The pericope of the Amnon–Tamar narrative in 2 Samuel 13:1–22 has been studied by so many Old Testament researchers; however, none has studied the narrative in the context of rape and its psychological effects in Enugu State. The article employs the synchronic aspect of narrative analysis in the study of 2 Samuel 13:1–22 and phenomenological design in the contextual framework. The data were mainly collected from secondary sources, which were then thematically analysed. Emergent themes from the pericope revealed loneliness, rejection, frustration, helplessness and depression. The findings of this study further showed that rape carries psychological effects such as identification, mistrust, withdrawal, suicidal tendency, the shame of stigmatisation, negative impact fixation, post-traumatic disorder, depression, fear and anger. It is obvious that David’s insensitivity towards Ammon’s sexual urge on Tamar aided his son to take advantage of his father’s parental flaw to rape Tamar, his half-sister.

Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: This article is a contribution to theology and ethics. It investigated the psychological effects that Tamar suffered during and after her rape experience and used it to interrogate the psychological effects that rape victims in Enugu State suffer. Therefore, the article provides a lucid response to the problem of rape and its psychological effects.


Keywords

rape; psychological effects; rape culture; shame; masculinity; depression

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 16: Peace, justice and strong institutions

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