Original Research

Prosperity gospel and the culture of greed in post-colonial Africa: Constructing an alternative African Christian Theology of Ubuntu

Thinandavha D. Mashau, Mookgo S. Kgatle
Verbum et Ecclesia | Vol 40, No 1 | a1901 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ve.v40i1.1901 | © 2019 Thinandavha D. Mashau, Mookgo S. Kgatle | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 21 June 2018 | Published: 11 April 2019

About the author(s)

Thinandavha D. Mashau, Department of Christian Spirituality, Church History and Missiology, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Mookgo S. Kgatle, Department of Christian Spirituality, Church History and Missiology, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa


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Abstract

Christianity in post-colonial Africa is highly influenced and shaped by the prosperity message. The popular and materialistic gospel is sweeping across the continent like a gale-force wind, which is irresistible. Previous studies on prosperity gospel have indeed defined the concept as a global phenomenon and in an African context. This study is an interdisciplinary reflection on prosperity gospel and the culture of greed in post-colonial Africa. The study proposes the African Christian Theology of Ubuntu as an alternative to prosperity gospel. Ubuntu is prescribed here as an antidote to the culture of greed in prosperity gospel because it is a theology of life, care, solidarity, economic justice, hope and accompaniment.

Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The paper challenges previous missiological perspectives on prosperity gospel and the culture of greed. The study proposes an African theology of Ubuntu as an alternative to prosperity gospel because it is a practical theology of life, care, solidarity, economic justice, hope and accompaniment.


Keywords

prosperity gospel; culture of greed; post-colonial Africa; African Christian Theology; Ubuntu

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