Original Research

Revisiting the legacy of the Circle of Concerned African Women Theologians today: A lesson in strength and perseverance

Helen A. Labeodan
Verbum et Ecclesia | Vol 37, No 2 | a1586 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ve.v37i2.1586 | © 2016 Helen A. Labeodan | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 02 February 2016 | Published: 08 July 2016

About the author(s)

Helen A. Labeodan, Department of Biblical and Ancient Studies, University of South Africa, South Africa

Abstract

This article sets out to do a historical review of the Circle of Concerned African Women Theologians from its inception to date. An appraisal of the challenges of the founding mothers will be critically analysed, how they were able to overcome obstacles as African women theologians in a society that is predominantly patriarchal and how the Circle was able to inspire African women to become subjects of their own histories, lives and stories. This article will reflect on the experiences of the founding mothers and how they were able to identify and reinterpreted some of the oppressive African cultures and strategies for overcoming them. The research methodology for this article will be qualitative. One of the major key players in the founding of the Circle – Mercy Amba Oduyoye – will be interviewed. It is expected that the wealth of experience of the legacy of Circle women theologians will help to resolve the current impasse within the Circle.

Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: In this article, the author critically reviewed the legacy of African women circle theologians. This was done by examining the history of Circle of Concerned African Women Theologians, their source of strength and how they were able to persevere over the years.

Keywords: Legacy; The Circle; women; Theologian


Keywords

Legacy; The Circle; women; Theologian

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Crossref Citations

1. Reimagining Africa-Diaspora Religious Connections: Global-Local Intersections of Immersive-Reflexive Praxis
R. Drew Smith
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doi: 10.29333/ejecs/1516